The Faithfulness Of Jesus

Notice: My friend in “the valley” has reached an impasse. A complete train wreck so to speak of his life. I am fighting to save him. I will resume shortly.

Therefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling,
consider the Apostle and High Priest of our confession, Christ Jesus,
who was faithful to Him who appointed Him,
as Moses also was faithful in all His house.

When I started this blog, I felt as if I was buried alive. Because of my health, I was unable to do much of anything. Fast-forward a few years and because of the spiritual exercise involved in blogging I reached a place where I was digging out of the pit. All of a sudden, my friend in “the valley” began slipping away and handed his life over to me completely. Now I was more buried than ever before.

I grew up on a farm, and I remember being amazed by the process of growth in small plants. Have you ever watched a delicate leaf dig its way up through hard soil? That struggle is what makes it into a strong and resilient crop.

I cannot imagine going through life without the faithfulness of Christ to hold me. As I yield myself to His instruction, He is consistently trustworthy and loyal to me and to His promises. And I find myself more resilient than ever.

We go into a little Old Testament history in this lesson that will help us better understand the next. The following excerpt titled “Christ and Moses” is from Andrew Murray’s classic The Holiest of All:

Moses and Aaron together represented God in Israel; the one as apostle or messenger, the other as high priest. In the person of Jesus the two offices are united. As High Priest He is merciful as Aaron; as Apostle of our profession He is faithful as Moses. Moses was the great apostle or messenger of God, the Old Testament type of Christ as prophet. He had access to God, and brought the word of God to the people.

Christ is the great Apostle or Prophet of the New Covenant. He ever spoke of Himself as the one whom the Father had sent; in Him, the Son, God speaks to us. As Apostle He is God's Representative with us, making God known to us; as High Priest, our Representative with God, bringing us into His presence.

As High Priest He stands linked to us by His mercy and compassion, as He now, having died for us, helps us in our temptation and weakness; as Apostle He pleads for God with us, and proves Himself entirely faithful to Him. We need to consider Christ Jesus, not only as a High Priest in His mercy, but as the Apostle of our profession who was faithful to Him that appointed Him, as also was Moses in all his house.

Faithfulness is trustworthiness. As we see Jesus faithful to Him who appointed Him, our faith and trust will rise into perfect and joyful assurance that He will indeed most faithfully fulfill all God's promises in us, that in us too He will be faithful as a Son over His own house. Nothing gives such strength to faith as resting on the faithfulness of Jesus. The glory of Jesus is the glory of Christianity; is the strength and glory of the Christian life.

Selah.

A Heavenly Life

“Therefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling,
consider the Apostle and High Priest of our confession, Christ Jesus,”

I wrestled with whether to move on to the next chapter in our study, or spend yet another week considering Jesus. Considering Jesus won. This is always a safe place to default when the “race” we are running gets to be too much for us. Through worship, we keep “looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith.” (Hebrews 12:2) He will be faithful to carry us. (More on this later.)

Last week we began to explore the roles that Jesus plays in our real and present lives as our Apostle and High Priest. Next week we will take a closer look at how Jesus’ life compares to these figures in the Old Testament. I cannot help but think that God is trying to show us something special here, something with eternal value. Something I do not want to miss.

For these reasons, we will continue to take this segment slowly. The following excerpt begins with a review from last time and is titled “Consider Jesus,” in Andrew Murray’s classic The Holiest of All:

Christians, at Pentecost, were people who by the new birth entered into the heavenly kingdom or state of life. And the kingdom entered into them. And they were partakers of a heavenly calling, because the spirit and the life and the power of heaven was within them.

It is to such men the invitation comes. Holy brethren! Partakers of the heavenly calling! Consider Jesus! If you would know what it is to be holy and to live holy, consider Jesus who makes holy! If you would know the privileges and powers that belong to you as partakers of a heavenly calling, consider Jesus! He is God, the King of heaven! He is Man who has ascended to heaven as your Priest and Savior, has opened it for you, and can communicate its life and blessedness. Oh, consider Jesus! Set your heart on Him; He will make you holy and heavenly.

There is more than one of my readers who mourns that he knows so little what it is to live a holy and a heavenly life. Listen, God's word speaks to you—Holy brethren, partakers of a heavenly calling! Consider Jesus! This is your weakness: you have looked at yourself and your own strength; you have not studied Jesus! This will be your cure: each day, each hour, consider Jesus, and in Him you will find all the holiness and the heavenliness you need.

In the latter part of the Epistle all the glory of Jesus as He entered heaven, and opened it for us, as He became a minister of the heavenly sanctuary, and leads us to dwell in the Father's presence, will be opened to us. But let us even now, from the commencement, hold fast the truth that the knowledge of Jesus seated in heaven is the power of the heavenly calling and the heavenly life.

Do not think that you know all that can be told about Jesus. Believe that there are wonders of heavenly joy to be revealed to you if you know Him better: His divine nearness and oneness with you, His ever-present indwelling to succor and lead you, His power to bring you into the Holiest of All, into the Father's presence and love, and to keep you there, will be revealed.

Selah.

The Holiness Of God

“Therefore, holy brethren, partakers of the heavenly calling,
consider the Apostle and High Priest of our confession, Christ Jesus,”

Only Andrew Murray can turn scripture into a poetic story. In case you do not know, the “Holiest of All” in the Old Testament is the innermost court of the tabernacle and the temple where the High Priest met alone with God once every year.

He would go into the closet and stand before God. He stood in the presence of God based on a blood sprinkled mercy seat. It is one of my very favorite subjects in the Bible and the reason I was drawn to this study.

I could not help but spend another week considering all that Jesus is as our Apostle and High Priest. May Murray's insight change us all. The following excerpt titled “Consider Jesus” is from Andrew Murray’s classic The Holiest of All:

Holy brethren! The word holy had also been just used. He that sanctifieth, maketh holy, and they who are sanctified, made holy, are all of one. We saw how holiness is the common mark of Christ and His people: their bond of union, and the great object they both aim at.

One of the great mysteries the Epistle is to reveal to us is that our great High Priest has opened the way for us into the Most Holy Place or the Holiest of All. In Hebrew it is the Holiness of Holinesses. There we have boldness of access, there we are to have our dwelling encircled by the holiness of God.

We must know that we are holy in Christ; this will give us courage to enter into the Holiness of Holinesses, to have God's holiness take complete possession, and fill our whole being. It is Jesus who makes holy: it is we who are to be made holy: what more natural than that the thoughts should be coupled together: holy brethren, consider Jesus.

Holy brethren! Partakers of a heavenly calling, consider Jesus! What is elsewhere spoken of as a holy calling is here named a heavenly calling. That does not only mean a calling from heaven, or a calling to the heaven, whence the call proceeds. No, there is much more in it.

Heaven is not only a place, but a state, a mode of existence, the life in which the presence of God is revealed and experienced in its unhindered power. And the heavenly calling is that in which the power of the heavenly life works to make our life heavenly.

When Jesus was upon earth the kingdom of heaven was nigh at hand; after He had ascended and received the kingdom from the Father, the kingdom of heaven came to this earth in power, through the descent of the Holy Spirit.

Christians, at Pentecost, were people who by the new birth entered into the heavenly kingdom or state of life. And the kingdom entered into them. And they were partakers of a heavenly calling, because the spirit and the life and the power of heaven was within them.

Selah.